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Astier de Villatte

Palais de Tokyo Incense

$50.00

Overlooking the river Seine, like a mysterious starship navigating the mysterious turbulence of artists’ imaginations, it dominates the view. A troubling fragrance floats between the raw cement walls of its wide, maze-like passageways, where a crowd of zealous and enlightened visitors feverishly gathers: intoxicating wisps of smoky wood, warm skin and metallic vibrations. Contains essences of Cedar Wood, Juniper, Gaïac Wood, Oak Moss and Cashemeran.

Astier de Villatte

Made in Japan / 125 sticks / 30 minute burn time / 6.25" long / Perfume designed with Christophe Raynaud

The best incense in the world is found on the island of Awaji, due to its favorable climate. For more than a thousand years it has been made here by the Koh-shis or Masters of Aromas, a tradition passed down from father to son. They alone perfectly master the four stages of production: the dosage of exclusively natural materials, precious woods, herbs, plants, vegetable resins, and perfume; the kneading of the dough, pressed and worked for a long time, then left to stand for two weeks to soak up the fragrance; the cutting of the dough, rolled into long, narrow ribbons, to the desired size; then drying in the west wind for three days before bundling the sticks.


  • Palais de Tokyo Incense

Astier de Villatte

Palais de Tokyo Incense

$50.00

Overlooking the river Seine, like a mysterious starship navigating the mysterious turbulence of artists’ imaginations, it dominates the view. A troubling fragrance floats between the raw cement walls of its wide, maze-like passageways, where a crowd of zealous and enlightened visitors feverishly gathers: intoxicating wisps of smoky wood, warm skin and metallic vibrations. Contains essences of Cedar Wood, Juniper, Gaïac Wood, Oak Moss and Cashemeran.

Astier de Villatte

Made in Japan / 125 sticks / 30 minute burn time / 6.25" long / Perfume designed with Christophe Raynaud

The best incense in the world is found on the island of Awaji, due to its favorable climate. For more than a thousand years it has been made here by the Koh-shis or Masters of Aromas, a tradition passed down from father to son. They alone perfectly master the four stages of production: the dosage of exclusively natural materials, precious woods, herbs, plants, vegetable resins, and perfume; the kneading of the dough, pressed and worked for a long time, then left to stand for two weeks to soak up the fragrance; the cutting of the dough, rolled into long, narrow ribbons, to the desired size; then drying in the west wind for three days before bundling the sticks.

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